Slovo Park at a Glance

Slovo Park is situated in a politically and socially sensitive stretch of land south of Soweto. The community has been known by national government as Nancefield, by local council as Olifantsvlei and in the last five years as Slovo Park – named in honour of South Africa’s first minister of housing and former Umkhonto we Sizwe General, Joe Slovo.

The forced changing of identity reflects an on-going struggle faced by the leadership of Slovo Park to gain recognition as a legitimate settlement to access governmental support. This battle has been fought through constant shifts in governmental policy, power and promises for the community of Slovo Park. Their only tactics comprising of service delivery protest, painstaking formal requests for upgrade and currently a lawsuit against the City of Johannesburg.

Currently the community of Slovo Park with its development partners are strategizing this key social and political move.


THIS SITE SERVES AS A PORTAL FOR THE COMMUNITY OF SLOVO PARK & THE VARIOUS DEVELOPMENT PARTNERS TO SHARE THE JOURNEY OF RE-DEVELOPMENT.

NEWSFEED



.

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Day 14: Walls and Postboxes

Today the first few courses of the the wall on the north edge of the site were layed.At the same time Arthur, Sam and Mpho, managed to push out the post boxes with alot of strength and patience.
There was some confusion about the drawings and where the wall ended and which bonds should be used where. As students we suddenly realized the importance of dimensions in a drawing and that they actually have to make sense, as to the order in which things are built and where elements are set out from.

Joe insisted that the drawings were fine, and that all architects draw like that, but as builders you always know what they actually mean to say.
In general the day presented various lessons on how to build practically, how to space expansion joints, how to key the mortar between the brick bond,from setting out to choosing brick patterns.

The Post boxes took a long while to get loose. Already rusted and vandalized these unused and damaged structures have great potential, to be given a second life, and play a productive role in the community.